Hamlet Act 1 Scene 1 Quotes

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  • Created by: __Jess
  • Created on: 12-06-22 15:28
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  • Act 1 Scene 1 Quotes
    • Disease
      • "Tis bitter cold and I am sick at heart."
        • Introduces the idea of disease and illness.
        • "Sick at heart" suggests corruption of morality.
    • Disorder
      • "This bodes some strange eruption to our state."
        • "Eruption" could have connotations with blistering and illness. (Plague).
          • Disease
            • "Tis bitter cold and I am sick at heart."
              • Introduces the idea of disease and illness.
              • "Sick at heart" suggests corruption of morality.
        • Horatio (the harbinger of truth) sees the ghost's visit as a premonition of chaos and disorder within Denmark.
    • Trust/mistrust
      • "Who's there?"
        • Darkness is obscuring Barnardo, portraying the idea of spying in the shadows, and characters lying.
      • "A little 'ere the mightiest Julius fell."
        • Caesar was killed by someone he trusted, like Hamlet Sr, and in the end, everyone else in the play.
      • "Not a mouse stirring."
        • Refers to Hamlet's play within a play called the Mousetrap.
          • Foreshadows the play, and suggests that Hamlet currently has no reason to "catch" Claudius, implying that Hamlet does not plot against Claudius for power or for Gertrude, but to avenge his father.
    • Religion
      • "Wherein our Saviour's birth is celebrated, The bird of dawning singeth all night long"
        • Suggests the crowing cockerel is a sign of religion and purity, and the fact that the ghost has to leave at this point could suggest they are the core of the corruption in Denmark.
      • "Upon a fearful summons."
        • Suggests the crowing cockerel is a sign of religion and purity, and the fact that the ghost has to leave at this point could suggest they are the core of the corruption in Denmark.

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