Boer War- The end of the war and extent of support for the war

?
What was the nickname for the Boer War?
The 'white man's war'
1 of 51
What was the role of black African recruits in the British Army?
Used to man blockhouses and used as scouts
2 of 51
How many Africans did the British recruit by 1902?
30,000
3 of 51
What were the opposing attitudes of different Boer militias at the end of the war?
'Joiners' accepted defeat, 'Bitter enders' fought to the last
4 of 51
Which treaty ended the war?
Treaty of Vereeninging
5 of 51
When was the Treaty of Vereeninging?
May 1902
6 of 51
What did the British do with the republics after the war?
Annexed them, took away Boer government and voting rights
7 of 51
What compensation did the British give to the Boers for brutal tactics?
Gave £3 million for reconstruction, and promised restoration of autonomy
8 of 51
When did the republics become autonomous?
1906/7
9 of 51
When did the uitlanders gain voting rights if they became citizens?
1907
10 of 51
When was South Africa formed?
1910
11 of 51
What was the total death toll for the war?
60,000
12 of 51
What was the total cost of the war?
£217 million
13 of 51
What were the beneficial outcomes of the war?
None
14 of 51
When did the Reform Acts increase the franchise to 60% of British men?
1867
15 of 51
What was the composition of government during the war?
Mainly aristocrats
16 of 51
Who split the liberals and over what issue?
Joseph Chamberlain over home rule of Ireland
17 of 51
How many liberals crossed the floor to form the liberal unionists?
1/3
18 of 51
What was the 'white man's burden'?
A God-given duty to 'civilise lesser races'
19 of 51
Why was there support for the war in 1899? (2)
Patriotism, pro-war press
20 of 51
Why was there support for imperialism? (3)
Indoctrination of children, press, 'white man's burden'
21 of 51
Why did support for the war decline after 1900?
Concentration camps
22 of 51
What did the secretary of state for war claim about the concentration camps?
Initially claimed they were 'voluntary', 'contented and comfortable', later said they were a 'military necessity'
23 of 51
Why did Campbell-Bannerman initially support the war?
Only 1/3 of the liberals were anti-war, so he didn't want a party split
24 of 51
Who was Emily Hobhouse?
A reporter for the Manchester Guardian
25 of 51
What did Hobhouse write about the Boers?
The British Army were murdering them
26 of 51
Who was photographed by Hobhouse, causing widespread lack of support for the war?
Lizzie van Zyl
27 of 51
Who denounced the war after Hobhouse's reports?
Campbell-Bannerman, Germany
28 of 51
How was the photo of Lizzie van Zyl manipulated by the government?
As propaganda to convince the British people that Boer parents neglected children
29 of 51
What was the Fawcett commission?
An all-female commission sent by Salisbury to Africa in 1901
30 of 51
What did the Fawcett commission recommend?
Increased rations and more nurses
31 of 51
What did Milner do to decrease casualty rates in concentration camps?
Gave control of the camps to local Boer authorities
32 of 51
Under local Boer authorities, what were death rates like in the camps?
Less than 2% (less than some British cities)
33 of 51
What was the impact of the concentration camps on Britain?
International shame
34 of 51
What did Kitchener do in 1901 to ease dissent against the war?
Stopped putting Boers in camps
35 of 51
What was the impact of Boers no longer going into concentration camps?
They died on the veldt instead, and Boer fighters were burdened by their families
36 of 51
What was 'Khaki fever'?
Support for the war and wars in general
37 of 51
How was khaki fever displayed in the population? (3)
Half a million gathered to wave off the first army going to Africa, thousands volunteered, celebrations when besieged towns were liberated
38 of 51
What event demonstrated the dangers of displaying anti-war attitudes?
Lloyd George escaped from a violent crowd in Birmingham town hall while denouncing the war
39 of 51
Who opposed the war from the start? (5)
Lloyd George, some liberals, socialists, some papers, Irish nationalists
40 of 51
Why did some people show a lack of support for the war?
Imperialism seen as immoral by some, Boers were innocent, Irish nationalists empathised with the Boer cause
41 of 51
What did Lloyd George claim about the Boers?
Devoted to family, farm, church
42 of 51
How were the people informed about the war?
The press
43 of 51
Why was there more knowledge about the Boer War than the Crimean War?
Improved literacy, technology allowed mass production and distribution of papers
44 of 51
Who founded the Daily Mail?
Alfred Harmsworth (Viscount Northcliffe)
45 of 51
When was the Daily Mail founded?
1896
46 of 51
How many copies of the Daily Mail were sold each day?
A million
47 of 51
What gave reporters and photographers an incentive to report on the war?
Paid generously
48 of 51
How did Roberts exercise press management?
Bribed reporters, kept reporters away from issues such as the typhoid epidemic due to poisoned water
49 of 51
Why was it possible to print more photos during the Boer War?
Cheaper technology
50 of 51
What equipment made film technology possible and why wasn't this used?
Bioscope invented 1895, expensive so films were usually staged
51 of 51

Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

What was the role of black African recruits in the British Army?

Back

Used to man blockhouses and used as scouts

Card 3

Front

How many Africans did the British recruit by 1902?

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

What were the opposing attitudes of different Boer militias at the end of the war?

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

Which treaty ended the war?

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
View more cards

Comments

No comments have yet been made

Similar History resources:

See all History resources »See all The British Experience of Warfare 1790-1918 resources »